CV

Lindsay Nelson
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science and Economics, Meiji University
lindsayrebeccanelson@gmail.com


EDUCATION

Ph.D. Comparative Literature, University of Southern California (May 2012)Dissertation: Embracing the Demon: Monstrous Children in Japanese Literature and Cinema, 1946-2008. Advisors: Anne McKnight and Akira Mizuta Lippit.

M.A. Comparative Literature, University of Southern California (May 2008)
M.A. Comparative Culture, Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan (July 2006)
B.A. English, B.F.A. Theatre Studies, University of Texas at Austin (May 2000)

TEACHING EXPERIENCE

Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and Economics, Meiji University (April 2017-present)
Project lecturer, Center for Global Communication Strategies, University of Tokyo (October 2014- March 2017)
Lecturer, continuing education program, Temple University Japan (Summer 2012)
Teaching Assistant, Global East Asia Japan Program, University of Southern California (July- August 2010)
Assistant Lecturer, Writing and Critical Reasoning, University of Southern California (Fall 2008- Spring 2010)
Teaching Assistant, Introduction to Japanese Literature. Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan (Spring 2006)

FELLOWSHIPS

Japan Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship (2010-2011)
Inamoto Scholarship (fall 2009)
ACE Nikaido Fellowship (summer 2009)
Foreign Languages and Area Studies Fellowship (2006-2008)
Sophia University Type II Scholarship (July 2004)


EMPLOYMENT HISTORY

2017-present: Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and Economics, Meiji University
2014-2017: Project lecturer, Center for Global Communication Strategies, University of Tokyo
2011-2014: Curriculum developer, World Family, Inc.
2008-2010: Assistant lecturer, University of Southern California Writing Program. 2006-2012: Graduate student, University of Southern California, Department of Comparative Literature
2004-2006: Graduate student, Sophia University, Department of Comparative Culture 2003-2004: Student, Sophia University Intensive Japanese Program
2000-2003: English teacher, AEON Corporation


PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS

Circulating Fear: Japanese Horror, Fractured Realities, and New Media. Lexington Books. 2021.

“‘That’s not very manly’: Debating Japanese Masculinities on Terrace House.” Japanese Studies, 41:1, January 2021, 41-57.

“Cinema at the Edge of the World: Visions of Precarity in the Films of Kazuyoshi Kumakiri,” in Politicizing the Screen: Japanese Visual Media, ed. Jennifer Coates, Routledge. 2021.

“Embracing Abjection, Reclaiming Agency: New Possibilities for the Zombie and the Social Recluse in Neet of the Living Dead,” Studies in the Humanities, 44:1-2, 2018, pp. 1-19.

“Choosing Illusion: Mediated Reality and the Spectacle of the Idol in Kōji Shiraishi’s Shirome,” Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema, 8:2, 2016, pp. 140-155.

“‘But I Am a Kid’: Optimizing Adolescence in Oshii Mamoru’s The Sky Crawlers,” East Asian Journal of Popular Culture, 2:1, 2016, pp. 125-146.

PUBLIC-FACING SCHOLARSHIP AND OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS
“Obscure, Reveal, Repeat: Hidden Worlds and Uncertain Truths in Kōji Shiraishi’s The Curse and Occult.” In Japanese Horror: New Critical Approaches to History, Narratives, and Aesthetics, edited by Subashish Bhattacharjee, Ananya Saha, and Fernando Pagnoni Berns. Lexington Books, forthcoming.

“Teaching Japanese Media Online in Japan: Challenges and Benefits.” JCMS Teaching Dossier, summer 2021. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/j/jcms/18261332.0060.806/–teaching-japanese-media-online-in-japan-challenges?rgn=main;view=fulltext

“Abjection: Mitsuko.” Japanese Media and Popular Culture: An Open-Access Digital Initiative of the University of Tokyo. May 2020. https://jmpc-utokyo.com/keyword/abjection/

“Pure Poison: The Gothic Femme Fatale in Japanese Horror Cinema.” 明治大学教養論集, spring 2019.

“From Scary to Scary-Cute: The Evolution of Japanese Horror Marketing.” 明治大学教養論集, spring 2018.

BOOK / FILM REVIEWS

Robo Sapiens Japanicus: Robots, Gender, Family, and the Japanese Nation, Jennifer Robertson. Japanese Studies, 2019.

“Tokyo Idols.” Pacific Affairs, 2018. https://pacificaffairs.ubc.ca/film-reviews/tokyo-idols-by-kyoko-miyake/

“My Man” and “The Light Shines Only There,” Electronic Journal of Contemporary Japanese Studies, 15:2, 2015.

“The Garden of Words.” Midnight Eye (http://www.midnighteye.com/reviews/the-garden-of- words/), September 2014.

Visions of Japanese Modernity: Articulations of Cinema, Nation, and Spectatorship, 1895-1925, Aaron Gerow. Discourse 34.1, winter 2012.

“Norwegian Wood.” Midnight Eye (http://www.midnighteye.com/reviews/norwegianwood/), January 2010.

“The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On.” Midnight Eye (http://www.midnighteye.com/reviews/ theemperorsnakedarmymarcheson/), October 2007.

ENCYCLOPEDIA ENTRIES

“Cool Japan,” アメリカ文化事典, アメリカ学会 / Encyclopedia of American Culture, The Japanese Association for American Studies, 2018. Encyclopedia entry.

“Tamami: The Baby’s Curse,” “Gakko no kaidan 2,” “Schoolgirl Apocalypse,” Encyclopedia of Japanese Horror, ed. Salvador Murguia, Rowman and Littlefield, 2016.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS AND LECTURES

“Gendered Spaces in Japanese Horror: Asato Mari’s Gekijōban: Zero.” Association for Asian Studies Conference (online), March 21-26, 2021.

“Interview with Prof. Lindsay Nelson on Shiraishi Kōji’s Shirome.” UBC Conversations with JHorror Scholars, produced by Colleen Laird, March 21, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_C5kzXoFxg&t=3s

“Performing Manliness on Terrace House.” AAS-in-Asia Conference (online), August 31-September 4, 2020.

“When the Fiction Game Gets Real: Idol Self-Parody and Self-Referentiality in Japanese Horror Films.” Association for Asian Studies Conference, Denver, Colorado, March 20-24, 2019.

“ ‘That’s not very manly’: Debating Japanese Masculinity for an International Audience on Terrace House.” Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Seattle, Washington, March 13-17, 2019.

“Vengeance in the Family: Japanese Horror, Ghosts, and the Terror of Everyday Life,” invited lecture, IES Tokyo, July 5, 2018.

“Things That Lurk: Representing Death and Ghosts in Japanese and English-Language Horror Media,” invited lecture, Chuo University, June 12, 2018.

“The Haunted Forest: Fighting for Ownership of Aokigahara in Contemporary Media,” Association for Asian Studies, Washington, DC (March 21-25, 2018)

“Cinema at the Edge of the World: Visions of Precarity in the Films of Kazuyoshi Kumakiri.” Cinema and Social Change in Japan, Kyoto University, October 20-22, 2017.

“Unlikely Heroes: Redefining Nation and Masculinity in Contemporary Japanese Zombie Films,” Nation, Gender, and History: Asian Cinemas in Perspective, Vilnius University, Centre of Oriental Studies, Vilnius, Lithuania, September 7-9, 2017.

“From Scary to Scary-Cute: The Evolution of Japanese Horror Marketing,” Asian Studies Conference Japan, Rikkyo University, Tokyo, July 8-9 2017.

“Idol / Aidoru Worship and the Spectacle of Adolescent Terror in Koji Shiraishi’s Shirome,” Association for Asian Studies Conference, Seattle, March 31-April 3, 2016.

“Post-Global Communities and Hidden Worlds in Kōji Shiraishi’s Occult,” Planetary Love Workshop, The University of Tokyo, July 2015.

“An Introduction to Film Theory.” Guest Lecture, Temple University, January 2012.

“Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Gender Outlaw?” Guest Lecture, Tsukuba University, spring 2011.

“Embracing the Monster: Vengeful Child Spirits in Contemporary Japanese Horror Films.” Japanese Film Workshop, Meiji Gakuin University, November 2010.

“Ghosts of the Past, Ghosts of the Future: Monsters, Children, and Contemporary Japanese Horror Cinema.” Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Los Angeles, March 2010.

“Fear of Youth: Modernity, Media, and the Figure of the Child in Kinji Fukasaku’s Battle Royale.” USC Comparative Literature Graduate Symposium, “The Politics of Figuration,” May 2008.

“City of Ghosts: Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Pulse and the Horror of Urban Existence.” Western Conference for the Association of Asian Studies, University of Utah, September 2007.

“A Question of Eating: Cannibalism in Fires on the Plain and The Stones Cry Out.” Japanese Studies Graduate Conference, UCLA, May 2007.

LANGUAGES
English (native)
Japanese (fluent)
Spanish (moderately fluent)
Portuguese (reading knowledge)